A walk among the Irish tombs

A walk dedicated to the Irish characters of the Cemetery

ireland 3

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

Route map

  • Use two-finger touch gestures to pan and zoom the map
  • Tap on Satellite to activate the rotate map function
  • Tap on numbers to show the grave at that position

Details


Time: About 80 minutes

Difficulty: Medium

Tips: The route covers various zones of the cemetery. Many graves are not on the main path and you need to use location references or photos to locate them. During the tour, inside the cemetery, it is strictly forbidden to smoke, drink and consume food, lean or sit on the graves and film in the cemetery. For information on the type of photos allowed, you can refer to the Visitor Center. It is also advisable to wear comfortable shoes for the walk and to pay attention to the large roots on the paths, especially in the Zona Seconda and we suggest you bring protective cream during the hottest period.

Route


Please find below the stages of this route:

  1. Moore Helena
  2. Helena Moore was an Irish girl. Read More

    Zone: A Position: 16

  3. Moore Isabella
  4. Isabella Moore was an Irish girl, eldest sister of Helena Moore. Read More

    Zone: A Position: 17

  5. Synnot, Anne Elizabeth
  6. Anne Elizabeth Synnot was born in Ballymore, County Armagh, Ireland. Read More

    Zone: A Position: 48

  7. Synnot, Walter (Sir)
  8. Sir Walter synnot is an Anglo-Irish landowner. Read More

    Zone: A Position: 54

  9. Somerville, Maria-Harriet (Lady) (Born Conyngham)
  10. Lady Maria was the daughter of General Sir Henry Conyngham, 1st Marquis Conyngham, and Elizabeth Denison. Read More

  11. Armstrong, Thomas Knox
  12. Thomas Knox Armstrong was born on 13 July 1797 at Drumglass in county Tyrone. Read More

    Zone: V Row: 11 Position: 22

  13. Atkins, James
  14. Son of James Atkins who came from Stranraer and settled in Belfast where, in Back Lane, off Princess Street, he carried on business as a coach painter and house painter, and died in 1828, aged 70. Read More

    Zone: V Row: 12 Position: 25

  15. Gonzales, Margarette
  16. Margaret Gonzales is an Irish woman, known in this context as her sepulchral monument was sculpted by the famous sculptor Giovanni Strazza. Read More

    Zone: 1 Row: 2 Position: 4

  17. Geoghegan (Called Lewis) Harold Charles
  18. The inscription on the gravestone reads: “1877-1941 To the memory of the poet “Lewis” Charles Harold Geoghegan “Il Bardo Errante” as he used to call himself. Read More

  19. Woodward, Francis Blake
  20. Reverend Francis Blake Woodward served the Anglican Church in Rome for fifteen years, from 1850 to 1866. Read More

    Zone: 1 Row: 12 Position: 32

  21. West, Amelia Louisa
  22. Amelia Louisa Nina West was the daughter of Reverend William James West and Elmina Erskine. Read More

    Zone: 2 Row: 11 Position: 12

  23. Rothwell, Richard
  24. The Irishman Richard Rothwell  was a painter who made the only known portrait of Mary Shelley. Read More

    Zone: 2 Row: 16 Position: 20

  25. Small, Thomas Gerrard
  26. Thomas Gerard Small, born in 1804 and died in 1885 in Rome, was the senior of the English medical practitioners in Rome. Read More

    Zone: 2 Row: 5 Position: 25

  27. Fitzmaurice, George, Mary and Elizabeth
  28. . Read More

    Zone: 3 Quarter: 1 Row: 8 Position: 17
The complete guide to find a grave

All the graves of the Non-Catholic Cemetery can be located through the position details that can be read within each single buried person’s page or gravestone’s page itself.

Exact position can be located by 4 simple fields: The Area (Zona), The quarter (Riquadro), The Row (Fila) and The Position (Posizione).

 

The Areas (Zona)

The Non-Catholic cemetery of Rome is composed by 5 large areas. All areas are bounded by walkable paths, so they are very easy to locate.

ATTENTION: We gently remind to all visitors that the Antica(A) area is a flat and grassy garden, and the graves are scattered in a very informal fashion. Furthermore we suggest you to exclusively refer to the walk’s map and also to the photo of the gravestone to locate the exact position.

 

The quarter* (Riquadro) *valid only for the Terza Zona (3)

The quarter is strictly related to the Terza Zona of the cemetery.

This area is divided into 4 quadrants numbered as shown in this map.

Only the graves in the Terza Zona will have the quarter indicated in the position information.

The field that represent the quarter will be empty/not visible in each other grave except the graves in the Terza Zona.

Please note that to identify any tomb it is always possible to refer to the walk’s map and to the photo of the grave.

 

 

 

 

The Row (Fila) 

The graves in the cemetery are mostly laid out in ordered rows.

Only the Zona Antica(A) and the tombs along the walls, for example ossuaries, are an exception.

In order to count the row number it is necessary to recognize the lower part of the cemetery as a reference. The Non-Catholic cemetery in fact extends over a slight slope (except for the Zona Antica which is flat but does not have rows).

The first row will always be the one at the lowest level compared to the others.

Once the first row is identified it will be easy to count all the others rows.

 

 

The Position (Posizione)

It is used to locate the grave within the reference row.

The position can be identified by counting the graves from left to right.

The count must be made always starting from the left end of the area where the tomb is located.

Menu